Simple & Easy – Emergency Preparedness
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Food Storage-1

“…and he will have his eyes fixed on the signs of the times, and that day will not overtake him unawares.” – JD 7:189.

We do seem to be undergoing a quickening of the times and that may be an important indication for each of us to evaluate our personal and family storage needs again.

As members of the Church we have been counseled for many many years to prepare and keep on hand at least a one-year supply of food. In the early days of our church the Saints were admonished to have a 7 year food supply. Then, for many years there was a time when a two-year supply was recommended, (and it undoubtedly would be a good idea for each of us to still keep a two-year supply if at all possible as this will allow us to share with others). But in the meantime it is imperative that we heed the current counsel to obtain and maintain at least a one-year minimum emergency food supply.

According to figures gathered by one of the food storage manufacturing firms, less than 6% of the members of the Church have an adequate emergency program.

Where do you fit into this figure?

Let’s enjoy life as much as we can – but let’s also be prepared. As we have recently seen, an unexpected disaster or loss of income can strike every s-o-o quickly.

“When the emergency is upon us, the time of preparation has passed.”

Our food supply is fragile

Grocery stores don’t stock weeks of food anymore. Most keep only 72 hours of food on the shelves. They re-stock based on just-in-time delivery of food supplies. If the trucks stop rolling in your part of the country during a crisis, the store shelves will be emptied almost immediately. In fact, expect a shortage of mainstay items like milk and bread to occur similar to what happens before an approaching hurricane hits. Those who are aware of the problem but who haven’t already made preparations will engage in a last-minute rush to buy a few extra supplies.

Transportation is the key to food

Without transportation, farmers can’t get their crops to the wholesalers or food processing facilities. Food is heavy, generally speaking, and it requires trucks and trains to move it around — a literal ARMY of trucks and trains, weaving their way from city to city, optimized and prioritized by computers. If the computers freeze, the whole transportation infrastructure will shut down.

Transportation also depends heavily on fuel, which means the oil-producing countries in the Middle East have to be able to produce the oil that gets refined into diesel fuel here in America. So, in other words, your food supply depends on Saudi Arabia being alive and well. Do you trust the people in charge in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, and Kuwait with your life? If you don’t make preparations now, you’re trusting them by default.

Cities depend entirely on rural land

Did you know cities would be ghost towns without the supporting imports of food from the country? We should all thank the farmers a little more, because they literally keep us all alive. Cities are like concrete islands. You might think a city is self-sustaining until you really think about it, but underneath it all, that city is a ghost town without the people in the country supporting it.

You may already know that city people and country people have very different views on politics and life in general. Country people tend to be more religious and more conservative. City people tend to be more liberal. So there’s more than a little animosity between country people and city people. When a crisis hits, and the country people find they are without electricity and fuel, they will still survive, for the most part, because they’re used to surviving. But do you think they will really put “saving city people” high on their list of priorities? I don’t think so. Any food that’s harvested from the fields will be kept and stored by the farmers themselves. They will NOT be shipping this stuff to the cities unless they have excess goods and can find a transportation method that still works (and has fuel). Unfortunately, if some emergency powers acts are signed into place by the President, the Federal Emergency Management Association will have the legal power to actually confiscate and redistribute food. This makes it all the more likely that farmers will harvest it and HIDE IT in order to keep it. And that means even less food making it to the cities. Bottom line? Cities where food can’t be delivered will eventually be gutted, looted, evacuated and likely burned to the ground.

You need to start stocking food

You can do a lot if you start early. Unfortunately, “early” might have been yesterday. Now we’re way past early, and you need a reasonable plan to get food supplies that will store well and don’t cost too much.

You’ve probably already realized that buying up extra cans of soup at the grocery store is a really stupid way to spend your preparedness money. You need a better plan. Every $10 you spend at the store might feed a person for a few days. You need more leverage, where you can spend $10 and feed a person for a few weeks.

Buy extra, use FIFO

Go ahead and buy more food than normal when you’re out shopping, and set it aside. Use the “first in, first out” rule to eat your older supplies first. Keep rotating your supplies so you never abandon food “way in the back.”

Buy ingredients, not prepared foods

Ingredients such as salt, honey, oatmeal and wheat will last a lot longer than prepared foods like TV dinners, cereals, and food mixes. Naturally, as you purchase food ingredients, you’ll want to practice actually using them! And remember the basics. For example, if you purchase a bag of wheat, how exactly do you plan to make flour out of it? I’ve personally seen plans in a survival book that described throwing some wheat in a coffee can and pounding it into flour with a blunt stick. You can make a few cups of flour after ten of fifteen minutes of noisemaking.